Tag Archives: social networks

Tweets Provide New Insight into Bullying Behaviors and Roles

Researchers have historically had a difficult time studying bullies and their victims. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are getting a much more in-depth view of bullying by studying interactions on Twitter.

“What we found, very importantly, was that quite often the victim and the bully and even bystanders talk about a real-world bullying incident on social media. The computers are seeing the aftermath, the discussion of a real-world bullying episode.”

 — Jerry Zhu, computer sciences professor, UW–Madison

The researchers have used machine learning to teach computers to comb through more than 250 million public Twitter posts a day. The work has identified more than 15,000 tweets per day related to bullying.

In addition to bullies, victims, accusers, and defenders – bullying roles identified by independent researchers in the early ‘90s – the researchers have identified a fifth role: that of “reporters.”

How is technology changing your life for the better?

Learn more at http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-08/uow-lms080112.php

© Tony Leininger and IT for Good 2012. See sidebar for full copyright notice.

Global Biodiversity Forecasting and Response System to Embrace Information, Networking Technologies

At the Global Biodiversity Informatics Conference (GBIC) held in Copenhagen, Denmark earlier this month, experts from around the globe agreed on key priorities for using information technologies and social networks to help understand life on Earth.

The focus of the work is on “how biodiversity can continue to sustain human lives and livelihoods.”

Information networks support and permeate nearly every aspect of our daily lives in areas such as banking, commerce and entertainment. We still do not have this kind of rich, globally-interconnected system for understanding and monitoring life on Earth. We know a lot about species, genetics, and ecology, but we can’t easily put this information together into a working knowledge system. This conference has given us a roadmap toward this goal.”

“Over the last quarter century, thousands of talented people have been working hard to bring essential biodiversity data onto the web. Much has already been achieved or is under development. GBIC has reinforced how important these activities are, and at the same time has outlined a path for us to build from where we are and deliver a rich globally-connected system for understanding and monitoring multiple aspects of biodiversity.”

— Donald Hobern, Executive Director, the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)

The overarching goal is to support collaborative biodiversity observation on a global level so that short-term changes and longer-term trends can be identified and appropriate responses can be enabled.

Next steps include developing an “outlook document” that will prioritize biodiversity informatics in order to create forecasting and response capabilities like those used in forecasting the weather and detecting earthquakes.

How is technology changing your life for the better?

Learn more at http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-07/gbif-bgc070612.php

© Tony Leininger and IT for Good 2012. See sidebar for full copyright notice.

Paralyzed Artist Writes and Paints Again with Help from Open Source Community

When L.A. street artist Tony “Tempt One” Quan was diagnosed with ALS, the disease left him virtually paralyzed. It looked like he would never paint or write again.

What happened next, though, would be practically unbelievable if it were to take place within a work of art. The documentary that tells this story, however, has captivated the minds of all who’ve seen it.

Now, the story of how open-source technology has given Quan a second chance to create is also getting a second chance of sorts before being released more widely.

This film NEEDS to be seen by people.”

— The most common viewer comment after seeing the film

The documentary, Getting Up: The TEMPT ONE Story, which was the recipient of the 2012 Audience Award  at the Slamdance Film Festival, needs some technical upgrading before it is more widely released. The goal behind the project: “Our purpose is to inspire people to see that when a singular individual teams up with a like-minded community, the once impossible becomes possible.”

How is technology changing your life for the better?

To get involved and learn more about this inspiring story, check out http://kck.st/KKYsG3

© Tony Leininger and IT for Good 2012. See sidebar for full copyright notice.

Facebook-like Approach for Sick Babies Wins IT Challenge

A human infant sleeps in his incubator at a ne...
A human infant sleeps in his incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit. [Photo by Chris Horry/Wikipedia]
The winning entry in the “Innovate 4 Healthcare Challenge” employs a social network approach similar to Facebook to help improve parents’ engagement in the care of sick babies.

The entry, dubbed “NeoStream,” was created by students in the Biomedical Informatics Department at the Stanford University School of Medicine to streamline communication between parents of critically ill children and the caregivers in neonatal intensive care units.

The Challenge is based on “radically improving healthcare through new processes that are enabled by innovative information technology applications and supported by a sustainable market strategy.”

The solutions were creative and most importantly, they were derived from multi-disciplinary viewpoints ranging from business and engineering to public health and medicine.”

— Kenyon Crowley, Director of Health Innovation at the UMD Center of Excellence in Health IT Research, and the competition’s director

The competition, which culminated in April, drew solutions from schools and programs across the country and overseas.

How is technology changing your life for the better?

Learn more at http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/news/stories/2012/Innovate4Healthcare.aspx

© Tony Leininger and IT for Good 2012. See sidebar for full copyright notice.

New Online Social Network Supports Adherents of Interactive Teaching

educational networking
The "flipped classroom" teaching model is gaining an online following thanks to a new social networking site for educators.

The Peer Instruction (PI) Network (www.peerinstruction.net), which was recently launched by Harvard University, is a worldwide social hub for educators who use – or are interested in using – interactive teaching methods. The site, which was “designed to improve student engagement and success,” was developed by Eric Mazur, Area Dean for Applied Physics and Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

“We are amazed by the response to the initial launch of the Peer Instruction Network. By connecting people who use interactive teaching methods, we hope to cultivate a community of practice that will have a global effect on educational change.”

— Eric Mazur, Area Dean for Applied Physics and Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Already, nearly 2,000 educators are participating in PI worldwide, sharing their experiences, submitting questions, and engaging with other PI users. Some of the countries currently represented by PI members include Ethiopia, Israel, Singapore, Vietnam, Finland, Germany, Greece, South Africa, and the United States.

Learn more at www.seas.harvard.edu/news-events/press-releases/peer-instruction

© Tony Leininger and IT for Good 2012. See sidebar for full copyright notice.